Address – Happy Holi http://happy-holi.com/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 04:51:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://happy-holi.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-7-150x150.png Address – Happy Holi http://happy-holi.com/ 32 32 Current and future San Jose mayors come together to celebrate Thanksgiving and fight homelessness – NBC Bay Area https://happy-holi.com/current-and-future-san-jose-mayors-come-together-to-celebrate-thanksgiving-and-fight-homelessness-nbc-bay-area/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 04:05:49 +0000 https://happy-holi.com/current-and-future-san-jose-mayors-come-together-to-celebrate-thanksgiving-and-fight-homelessness-nbc-bay-area/ The past and future of San Jose leadership came together on Tuesday. The city’s current and future mayor both reunited at a holiday event on homelessness and housing. Mayor Sam Liccardo and Mayor-Elect Matt Mahan came together to serve a celebratory meal to residents of Evan’s Lane. It is one of the mini-house projects for […]]]>

The past and future of San Jose leadership came together on Tuesday.

The city’s current and future mayor both reunited at a holiday event on homelessness and housing.

Mayor Sam Liccardo and Mayor-Elect Matt Mahan came together to serve a celebratory meal to residents of Evan’s Lane.

It is one of the mini-house projects for the homeless that opened last year and has already served 244 people.

All live in temperature-controlled family units until they transition to permanent housing.

Each house has four beds, a closet and two bathrooms.

While the service was all smiles, Liccardo said this site is a roaming solution that works.

There are three in San Jose, and another will open in a few days near the police department.

“With a council vote, hopefully next week, we can say we have 1,000 of these units under development here in the city of San Jose,” Liccardo said. “We know this is a faster way, a more nimble way for us to serve our homeless residents.”

Housing and homelessness have long been described as the city’s main problems.

“The truth is that we have often hindered the government and made it too difficult to build housing,” Mahan said when asked what he would do to address these issues in the future. “We need to speed up permitting, control fees, streamline our review processes and help those who want to build the homes we desperately need to do so.”

And with a significant setback on the part of many neighborhoods, is it possible to carry out other projects like this?

“We don’t just offer a site like this to help those who are homeless. We are, but it’s good for the whole community,” Mahan said. “We see a cleaner city, a safer city… the more we invest in these kinds of solutions, the better off we all are and I think it’s incumbent on us as elected officials to make that point with people. ‘a naturally skeptical public.”

Families attending Tuesday’s meal said they were happy to have a catered Thanksgiving meal.

The hope now is that the city’s newly elected leaders can find sustainable solutions to make meals like this less necessary.

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To better address the climate crisis, the United States must reform its permitting process https://happy-holi.com/to-better-address-the-climate-crisis-the-united-states-must-reform-its-permitting-process/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 08:00:03 +0000 https://happy-holi.com/to-better-address-the-climate-crisis-the-united-states-must-reform-its-permitting-process/ The topic of licensing reform has long been caught in the all-too-familiar crossfire. Fossil fuel interests and other industry lobbyists generate endless proposals under the guise of “reform” that would weaken the standards and protections needed to avert climate catastrophe and protect our health and environment. Environmental groups and other progressives reflexively defend the status […]]]>

The topic of licensing reform has long been caught in the all-too-familiar crossfire. Fossil fuel interests and other industry lobbyists generate endless proposals under the guise of “reform” that would weaken the standards and protections needed to avert climate catastrophe and protect our health and environment. Environmental groups and other progressives reflexively defend the status quo as sacrosanct or easily corrected by adjustments to bureaucratic practice.

The permissions reform proposal that Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia proposed earlier this year echoed that pattern, sending both parties to their corners and frustrating any truly inclusive, bipartisan dialogue about improving the current system. But now that the White House has signaled that it wants to authorize the reform during the lame duck session of Congress, there is a opportunity for all parties to work together to craft a more effective bill.

Progressives can’t be afraid to start this conversation. A recent report from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory found that to meet President Biden’s commitment to fully decarbonize the electric grid by 2035, the United States will need to more than quadruple the rate at which it deploys renewable energy technologies while building extensive power transmission infrastructure. support. A Princeton study suggests that 80% of the emissions reductions promised by the IRA will be lost if we do not accelerate the development of clean energy and transmission.

And that’s just in the energy sector. To hope to modernize the nation’s transportation sector, we must invest in mass transit alternatives to gas-powered vehicles while reconnecting communities that have been divided by poorly designed projects. Trips between certain points on the Northeast Corridor, our nation’s busiest rail line, take longer today than they did in the 1980s due to chronic underinvestment and these bureaucratic hurdles. The bipartisan Infrastructure Act committed more than $864 billion to address these issues, but without serious efforts to make these projects faster and cheaper, we will fail to get the most out of this investment.

It can take a decade to license and build offshore wind, clean transmission and major power transmission. It is as unacceptable as it is unnecessary. While authorization is not the only source of delay, it is virtually impossible to build critical infrastructure and clean energy under the current approach to federal project review and approval, state and local. To pretend otherwise sacrifices any U.S. claim to global climate leadership and any hope for the communities most affected by pollution and fossil fuel-related climate risks.

The current system has its virtues. Environmental and community groups have been able to stop many destructive projects through the scrutiny and public participation mandated by current law. Judicial review, although a source of delay, has provided an essential safeguard in the current system.

Unfortunately, the fossil fuel industry and wealthy interests have too often co-opted the process to their advantage. They are able to overwhelm, evade lawyers, and survive underfunded advocacy and community groups while deploying far more money and influence. Look no further than New England: In Massachusetts, fossil fuel interests are funding bogus litigation under the National Environmental Policy Act and Endangered Species Act to stop offshore wind projects. In Connecticut, opposition to efforts to upgrade the Northeast Rail Corridor most often comes from wealthy landowners, not environmental groups or low-income citizens.

Rather than idealizing the status quo, we need to imagine and build consensus around reforms that lead to faster and better decisions and elevate substantive protections above procedural countermeasures. Transitioning to clean energy and achieving climate justice requires tough choices, and progressives and environmentalists must recognize that these choices are necessary. The work to achieve a cleaner and fairer future will only be possible if we lead the cause of empowering reform and stop ceding this ground to the opposition.

Otherwise, our hopes for timely and just climate action, rational infrastructure choices, and healthier communities using the new resources Congress has just provided will be crushed under the slow wheels of a broken system.

Chris Murphy is a United States Senator from Connecticut. Brad Campbell is chairman of the Conservation Law Foundation, former regional administrator for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, former commissioner of the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, and former senior official of the White House Council on Environmental Quality. .

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G20, APEC, ASEAN: world leaders conclude three summits in Asia, Russia firmly on the sidelines https://happy-holi.com/g20-apec-asean-world-leaders-conclude-three-summits-in-asia-russia-firmly-on-the-sidelines/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 07:28:00 +0000 https://happy-holi.com/g20-apec-asean-world-leaders-conclude-three-summits-in-asia-russia-firmly-on-the-sidelines/ Bangkok, Thailand CNN — The three major summits of world leaders that took place across Asia last week made one thing clear: Vladimir Putin is now sidelined on the world stage. Putin, whose attack on Ukraine over the past nine months has devastated the European country and upended the global economy, refused to attend any […]]]>


Bangkok, Thailand
CNN

The three major summits of world leaders that took place across Asia last week made one thing clear: Vladimir Putin is now sidelined on the world stage.

Putin, whose attack on Ukraine over the past nine months has devastated the European country and upended the global economy, refused to attend any of the diplomatic gatherings – and instead found himself subjected to a significant censorship as international opposition to his war seemed to harden.

A meeting of Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) leaders in Bangkok ended on Saturday with a statement referencing nations’ positions expressed in other forums, including in a UN resolution deploring “in the terms the strongest” Russian aggression against Ukraine, while noting divergent views.

It echoes verbatim a statement from the Group of 20 (G20) leaders’ summit in Bali earlier this week.

“Most members strongly condemned the war in Ukraine and stressed that it was causing immense human suffering and exacerbating existing fragilities in the global economy,” the document said, adding that there were “assessments” different about the situation within the group.

Summit talks aside, the week also showed Putin – who is believed to have launched his invasion in a bid to restore Russia’s supposed former glory – increasingly isolated, the Russian leader being cowered in Moscow and not even wanting to face his counterparts at major global meetings.

Fear of potential political maneuvers against him if he left the capital, an obsession with personal safety and a desire to avoid confrontational scenes at summits – especially as Russia faces heavy losses on the battlefield – were all probable calculations that went into Putin’s assessment. , according to Alexander Gabuev, senior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

In the meantime, he may not want to draw unwanted attention to the handful of nations that have remained friendly with Russia, for example India and China, whose leaders Putin saw at a regional summit in Uzbekistan in September.

“He doesn’t want to be this toxic guy,” Gabuev said.

But even among countries that have not taken a hard line against Russia, there are signs of losing patience, if not with Russia itself, than with the ripple effects of its aggression. Energy tensions, food security concerns and spiraling global inflation are now weighing on economies around the world.

Indonesia, which hosted the G20, did not explicitly condemn Russia for the invasion, but its President Joko Widodo told world leaders on Tuesday “we must end the war”.

India, which has been a key buyer of Russian energy even as the West has shunned Russian fuel in recent months, also reiterated its call to “find a way back to the path of ceasefire”. fire” at the G20. The final declaration of the summit includes a sentence saying: “The era of today must not be one of war” – language that echoes what Modi said to Putin in September, when they met met on the sidelines of the summit in Uzbekistan.

It’s less clear whether China, whose strategic partnership with Russia is bolstered by a close relationship between leader Xi Jinping and Putin, has shifted its stance. Beijing has long refused to condemn the invasion, or even refer to it as such. He instead decried Western sanctions and amplified Kremlin talking points blaming the United States and NATO for the conflict, though that rhetoric appeared to be echoed somewhat in his state-controlled domestic media in recent months.

In sideline meetings with Western leaders last week, however, Xi reiterated China’s call for a ceasefire through dialogue and, according to his interlocutors’ readings, agreed to oppose the use of nuclear weapons in Ukraine – although these remarks were not included in China’s statement. account of the talks.

But China’s foreign policy watchers say its desire to maintain strong ties with Russia likely remains unwavering.

“While these statements are an indirect criticism of Vladimir Putin, I don’t think they are meant to alienate China from Russia,” said Brian Hart, a fellow with the China Power Project at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington. “Xi says these things to an audience that wants to hear them.”

Russian isolation, however, looks even more stark against the backdrop of Xi’s diplomatic tour of Bali and Bangkok this week.

Although US President Joe Biden’s administration has singled out Beijing – not Moscow – as the “most serious long-term challenge” to the world order, Xi has been treated as a valued global partner by Western leaders, including many have met with the Chinese leader for talks aimed at increasing communication and cooperation.

Xi had an exchange with US Vice President Kamala Harris, who represents the United States at the APEC summit in Bangkok, at Saturday’s event. Harris said in a Tweet after noting a “key message” from Biden’s own G20 meeting with Xi – the importance of keeping lines of communication open “to responsibly manage competition between our countries.”

And in an impassioned call for peace made Friday at a meeting of business leaders on the sidelines of the APEC summit, French President Emmanuel Macron appeared to distinguish between Russia’s actions and tensions with the China.

While referring to US-China competition and growing confrontation in Asian regional waters, Macron said: “What makes this war different is that it is an assault on international rules. . All countries … have stability thanks to international rules”, before calling on Russia to return “to the table” and to “respect the international order”.

US Vice President Kamala Harris meets with US allies at APEC after North Korea launched a ballistic missile on Friday.

The urgency of that sentiment was heightened after a Russian-made missile landed in Poland killing two people on Tuesday during the G20 summit. As a member of NATO, a threat to Polish security could trigger a response from the entire bloc.

The situation defused after an initial investigation suggested the missile came from the Ukrainian side in an accident during missile defense – but highlighted the potential for a miscalculation that could spark a global war.

A day after this situation, US Secretary of State Antony Blinken pointed out what he called a “split screen”.

“As the world strives to help the most vulnerable, Russia is targeting them; as world leaders reaffirmed our commitment to the Charter of the United Nations and to international rules that benefit all our peoples. President Putin continues to try to shred those same principles,” Blinken told reporters Thursday night in Bangkok.

As International Meetings Week approached, the United States and its allies stood ready to take this message to our international peers. And while strong messages have been sent out, it has not been easy to build consensus around this view – and differences remain.

The G20 and APEC statements both acknowledge the divisions between how members voted at the UN to support its resolution “deploring” Russian aggression, and say that while most members “strongly condemned the war, “there were other points of view and different assessments of the situation and the sanctions.”

Even making such an expression with caveats was an arduous process at both summits, officials said. Indonesian Jokowi said G20 leaders were up until “midnight” to discuss the paragraph on Ukraine.

Thai Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha and Chinese leader Xi Jinping meet at APEC on November 18, 2022 in Bangkok, Thailand.

“There was a lot of pressure after the G20 reached consensus on its communiqué,” Matt Murray, senior US APEC official, said in an interview with CNN after the summit concluded, adding that the United States had been consistent in lower-level meetings. “all year” on the need to address the war in the forum, given its impact on trade and food security.

“In every case where we didn’t get a consensus sooner, it was because Russia blocked the statement,” he said. Meanwhile, “middle economies” were concerned about the invasion but not sure it should be on the agenda, according to Murray, who said statements released this week at APEC were the result of over 100 hours of in-person discussions. and online.

The nations of the groupings maintain various geostrategic and economic relations with Russia, which has an impact on their positions. But another concern some Asian countries may have is whether moves to censor Russia are part of a US push to weaken Moscow, according to former Thai foreign minister Kantathi Suphamongkhon, speaking to CNN in the days before the summit.

“Countries are saying we don’t just want to be a pawn in this game to be used to weaken another power,” said Suphamongkhon, a member of the advisory board of the RAND Corporation Center for Asia Pacific Policy. Instead, framing Russia’s censorship around its “violation of international law and war crimes that may have been committed” would touch on aspects of the situation that “everyone here rejects”, he said. declared.

Russia’s rejection along these lines may also send a message to China, which itself flouted an international ruling refuting its territorial claims in the South China Sea and vowed to “reunite” with Taiwan’s self-governing democracy. that she never controlled. , by force if necessary.

While this week’s efforts may have increased the pressure on Putin, the Russian leader has experience of such dynamics: prior to Putin’s expulsion following his 2014 annexation of Ukrainian Crimea, the Group of Seven (G7) was the Group of Eight – and it remains to be seen whether international expressions will have an impact.

But without Putin in the fold, leaders stressed this week, the suffering will continue – and there will be a hole in the international system.

This story has been updated with new information.

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Despite improvements in lung cancer screening, greater efforts are still needed to address disparities https://happy-holi.com/despite-improvements-in-lung-cancer-screening-greater-efforts-are-still-needed-to-address-disparities/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 20:24:14 +0000 https://happy-holi.com/despite-improvements-in-lung-cancer-screening-greater-efforts-are-still-needed-to-address-disparities/ The State of Lung Cancer 2022 report released by the American Lung Association illustrates aspects of diagnosis and care that need additional attention to address disparities and increase national commitment to screening and treatment while reducing exposure to risk factors. Lung cancer remains the leading cause of death among all cancer types, even though the […]]]>

The State of Lung Cancer 2022 report released by the American Lung Association illustrates aspects of diagnosis and care that need additional attention to address disparities and increase national commitment to screening and treatment while reducing exposure to risk factors.

Lung cancer remains the leading cause of death among all cancer types, even though the survival rate has risen from 21% to 25% nationwide in the past 5 years, according to the 2022 report on the American Lung Association Lung Cancer Status. The annual report aimed to outline the burden of lung cancer at the national and state levels, including a spotlight on disparities, and offer opportunities to prevent the disease and save lives.

Nationally, 21% of cases are still not receiving treatment, even though there has been a 15% improvement rate in treatment over the past 5 years. With rates varying from state to state, 237,000 people will be diagnosed with lung cancer this year, representing an 11% decrease in national new cases of lung cancer over the previous 5 years.

Since lung cancer is usually detected at an advanced stage, the 5-year survival rate is among the lowest. 5 years after a diagnosis of lung cancer, 25% of patients are alive, which represents a 21% improvement over 5 years. Over the past 5 years, early diagnosis rates have increased by 17%.

Access to treatment and screening tools for early diagnosis can prolong and improve quality of life, according to the report, which highlighted opportunities for improvement. The high mortality rate of lung cancer can be improved by using low-dose CT scans as an annual screening tool to identify early-stage tumors that have a higher likelihood of curability and can reduce mortality rates by up to 20% of the time.

Most health care payers are required to cover lung cancer screening, but state Medicaid programs are one of the few programs that are not required to do so for the traditional Medicaid population. And if testing is covered, plans may require patients to meet eligibility criteria such as prior authorization or pay for their tests.

A state assessment of screening coverage for the Medicaid population by the American Lung Association found that 46 state fee-based Medicaid programs offer coverage for lung cancer screenings, while 3 programs offer none. hedging and 1 has no obtainable information regarding their hedging policy.

According to the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), lung cancer screening guidelines for 2021 target people between the ages of 50 and 80 who have 20 or more pack-years (eg, 1 pack a day for 20 years, 2 packs over 10 years) and currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years.

Racial and ethnic disparities were a focus of the report, which found a lower 5-year survival rate for communities of color at 20% compared to 25% nationally.

Compared to white Americans, people of color currently have poorer outcomes after a lung cancer diagnosis, according to the report. The likelihood of early diagnosis and obtaining surgical treatment is less, and these populations are more likely to receive no treatment.

For example, compared to their white counterparts, black Americans are 19% less likely to receive surgical treatment, and Latinos are 28% more likely to receive no treatment.

The report also noted how screening guidelines have evolved to address persistent racial disparities in lung cancer outcomes.

In March 2021, the USPSTF used emerging research to include a broader age range and greater number of current and former smokers in its screening recommendation, significantly increasing the number of female and Black Americans in the population. high risk.

However, in 2021, of those considered high risk, only 5.8% were screened, indicating that more high risk people need to be screened to increase screening efficiency and save more lives.

The report authors noted that the incidence and treatment data are from 2015 to 2019, so they do not reflect the potential impact of COVID-19 on cancer diagnosis, treatment or survival. Still, they expressed hope that the information in the report would be helpful to researchers and policymakers seeking to reduce the burden of lung cancer in the United States.

In a press release, the American Lung Association said the report “emphasizes that states must do more to reduce the burden of lung cancer and encourages everyone to join the effort to end lung cancer.” lung”.

Reference

State of Lung Cancer: 2022 Report. American Lung Association. November 15, 2022. Accessed November 16, 2022. https://www.lung.org/getmedia/647c433b-4cbc-4be6-9312-2fa9a449d489/solc-2022-print-report

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University students call on administration to meet economic demands https://happy-holi.com/university-students-call-on-administration-to-meet-economic-demands/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 20:25:42 +0000 https://happy-holi.com/university-students-call-on-administration-to-meet-economic-demands/ UC Davis workers began striking Monday, Nov. 14, calling for an end to UC’s “unlawful behavior,” which they say is preventing agreements on fair contracts. These include living wages to meet the “rent burden, increased childcare subsidies for university parents, sustainable public transport benefits and increased fees for international scholars”. , according to a statement […]]]>

UC Davis workers began striking Monday, Nov. 14, calling for an end to UC’s “unlawful behavior,” which they say is preventing agreements on fair contracts. These include living wages to meet the “rent burden, increased childcare subsidies for university parents, sustainable public transport benefits and increased fees for international scholars”. , according to a statement provided by the organizers.

Elected bargaining teams made up of university student workers, postdocs, university researchers and student researchers called the strike after 36,558 university workers voted to strike by a 98% margin.

Represented by the United Auto Workers (UAW), this strike will be the largest strike by university workers in the nation’s history and its first-ever strike by postdoctoral and academic researchers.

In a collective effort to “shut down the University”, at 10 a.m. about 1,000 picketers lined up along Russell Boulevard in College Park and along La Rou and Hutchinson, exceeding expectations so early in the morning.

Dr. Ximena Anleu Gil, Ph.D. candidate in Plant Cell Biology and Development, said that throughout the negotiations, rather than reaching fair agreements, the University has “engaged in a wide variety of illegal tactics. UC’s unlawful conduct prevents us from entering into fair agreements that ensure fairness and decent compensation.

She said the student bargaining team negotiated in good faith to tackle the heavy rent burden faced by university workers. “UC unfortunately didn’t show us that respect,” she said.

Organizers hope the University will end the strike by addressing its unfair labor practices and bargaining in good faith. “Workers are now climbing to check the conduct of the University. Without the University changing course, we cannot win our claims,” Gil said.

“What I hope to see is, honestly, a successful strike and a great contract to come out of it. I mean, we’re going to close the university, and that will have a ripple effect across the United States. I mean, other schools realized they couldn’t just abuse their graduates,” said Emily Weintraut, a Ph.D. student at the Glen Fox Lab (Malting and Brewing Science ).

In an LA Times letter to the editor, titled “UC Defends Contract Offer in Union Negotiations to Avoid Strike,” Michael Brown, UC provost and executive vice president for academic affairs, said that UC had proposed multi-year salary increases, with the first-year increase ranging from 4% to 26% depending on the bargaining unit.

Brown wrote that the University continues “to increase the amount of affordable housing on our campuses. “Our system is already offering rents 20-25% below market rates, and some students are getting even bigger discounts.”

He defended UC’s bargaining tacts, saying UC submitted proposals in good faith. He added that the UC Board of Trustees, since 2017, has allocated more than $57 million in funding to address housing needs.

The last day of the fall term is December 9, with final exams scheduled for December 5-9.

The impact this can have on undergraduate students completing their fall term is recognized. “We know that our working conditions are the learning conditions of our students. Right now, the quality of education we can provide is compromised because we are struggling to make ends meet. If UC meets our demands for fair compensation, we will be much better able to focus on our teaching. So we know that a temporary disruption to our students’ education is worth a long-term improvement in everyone’s experience at UC,” Gil said.

“Not all teaching time takes place in a classroom. Sometimes you have to defend yourself. Our students and colleagues are with us. They understand that when you’re treated unfairly, you have to speak up,” she said.

In a letter to faculty dated November 10, co-signed by Susan Cochran, chair of the academic council, and James Steintrager, vice president, questions regarding workers’ rights were directed to the administration and office of the president.

For example, the letter states that the University may “reassign duties to employees or hire temporary workers to assist faculty who are so burdened with covering striking work while the strike is in progress. However, locating and assigning staff or administrators with academic experience and disciplinary expertise to assist with the task of scoring assignments may prove impractical.

Weintraut said her teacher allowed her to talk to her class about the strike. She added, however, that in an undergraduate class she attends, someone got scolded for it. “So there’s definitely a lot of anti-union struggle on the UC side, and I have professors who are afraid of that.”

Diana Sernas, a graduate student in the Department of Integrative Genetics and Genomics, told The Enterprise that UC has more than $40 billion in its budget. At present, all university workers represent approximately 1% of the UC budget. “If they give in to all of our economic demands, we’ll be 3%, so they have the money,” she said.

Gil said when UC pays extremely low wages, it limits who can participate here. “UC should be an engine of social mobility – not a place where only people who enjoy generational wealth can afford to work.”

— Contact Monica Stark at monica@davisenterprise.net.

Look:

On Monday morning, striking graduate students from UC Davis picket the corner of Russell Boulevard and Howard Way.

Striking UC Davis students picket Monday morning at the corner of La Rue Road and Hutchison Drive.

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New York CEOs want Governor Hochul to tackle taxes and crime https://happy-holi.com/new-york-ceos-want-governor-hochul-to-tackle-taxes-and-crime/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 07:10:27 +0000 https://happy-holi.com/new-york-ceos-want-governor-hochul-to-tackle-taxes-and-crime/ New York Congressman-elect Anthony D’Esposito discusses Republican gains in the New York House races and why solid blue districts turned red on “Cavuto: Coast to Coast.” A group representing some of Wall Street’s biggest titans said Governor Kathy Hochul has her work cut out over the next four years after her election victory. The state […]]]>

A group representing some of Wall Street’s biggest titans said Governor Kathy Hochul has her work cut out over the next four years after her election victory. The state still faces challenges retaining and attracting businesses after the pandemic.

Partnership for New York President and CEO Kathryn Wylde, whose organization’s executive committee includes JP Morgan’s Jamie Dimon and BlackRock’s Larry Fink, spoke with FOX Business about the group’s wishlist as Hochul begins his first full term at the helm and the Governor of New York faces obstacles in achieving them.

New York Governor Kathy Hochul waves during election night in New York City on November 8, 2022. (Timothy A. Clary/AFP via Getty Images/Getty Images)

Following Hochul’s victory over Republican challenger Lee Zeldin this week, Wylde released a statement regarding PNYC’s priorities while expressing confidence in the governor’s willingness and ability to meet them.

“The city’s business community looks forward to working with Governor-elect Kathy Hochul to maintain a strong economy and create a more competitive climate to develop and attract talent and create jobs in New York State,” said Wylde’s press release.

AOC FIRE FOR ‘PATIENTLY FALSE’ ALLEGATIONS ON CRIME, LAW ENFORCEMENT: ‘SHE IS DELUSIVE’

“The next four years will involve fiscal challenges, while requiring additional state investments in affordable housing, expanding mental health services and training the workforce,” she said. added. “It will require tough decisions from the governor, who is definitely up to it.”

Wylde told FOX Business that New York City’s economy has been able to thrive in recent years thanks to record profits fueling strong tax collections and federal pandemic relief bolstering budgets like the system. city ​​metro.

But times have changed.

“The No. 1 issue will be fiscal stability for the city and state as we enter a period of inflation and market volatility – or [what’s happening] in Ukraine, etc. – led to the fall of Wall Street markets in 2022,” says Wylde.

NYSE trader checks the data

A trader works during the New York Stock Exchange opening bell on Wall Street in New York City. (Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images/Getty Images)

She explained that not only are Wall Street profits down, but commercial real estate has lost over $400 billion and has a 20% vacancy rate. Thus, income tax revenues and property tax revenues for the next two years will be significantly lower than budgets require.

Given these issues, Wylde says the question is whether state and local leaders will have the discipline to rein in spending.

“Particularly at the state level, where the legislature is eager to spend money that we don’t have, the governor is going to be able to try to manage spending expectations that we may not be able to. afford without a tax increase,” she says. “And we think a tax hike will drive business and talent out of town.”

NYC SUBWAY ACCUSED SHOOTING ‘TERRORIST’ FRANK JAMES SEEKS TO HAVE MOVED TRIAL IN CHICAGO

Crime also drives talent out of a city.

The New York City Police Department is doing its job on the front lines with high arrest rates while prosecutions and convictions are low, Wylde says. The courts are under state jurisdiction and prosecutions are subject to state law.

police subway

An NYPD officer patrols the subway platform at the 36th Street subway station on April 13, 2022, in the Sunset Park neighborhood of Brooklyn. (Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images/Getty Images)

The PNYC sees mental health as a way to address crime issues in New York City, as it lacks facilities to treat people who need services. Many potential patients end up on the streets due to a lack of laws and procedures to keep people in treatment facilities when they need them.

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Wylde says another major problem contributing to crime in the city is illegal firearms and thanks Hochul and New York City Mayor Eric Adams for doing a good job on that front.

But “what most people who use the subway are most afraid of isn’t guns,” she added, “it’s being pushed in front of a subway by someone who suffers from mental illness”.

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How a new partnership and potential $4 million grant will address unique housing needs https://happy-holi.com/how-a-new-partnership-and-potential-4-million-grant-will-address-unique-housing-needs/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 11:43:27 +0000 https://happy-holi.com/how-a-new-partnership-and-potential-4-million-grant-will-address-unique-housing-needs/ Simplified: This summer, Minnehaha County received a $775,000 grant to create an incarcerated housing plan. Now the county is asking for an additional $4 million to help fund a partnership with the Glory House to meet those unique housing needs. why is it important The county was one of four regions in the country to […]]]>

Simplified: This summer, Minnehaha County received a $775,000 grant to create an incarcerated housing plan. Now the county is asking for an additional $4 million to help fund a partnership with the Glory House to meet those unique housing needs.

why is it important

  • The county was one of four regions in the country to receive this grant of the MacArthur Foundation and the Urban Institute. After a six-month planning period (begun in early summer), each of the four communities will submit additional funding requests – Minnehaha asks for $4 million to support his new project “Just Home”.
  • Accessible and affordable housing is a hot topic and pressing issue in Sioux Falls right now. But many existing affordable housing programs are not accessible to people with a crime on their record.
  • If the county gets the money it’s asking for, $3 million is expected to fund a partnership with the Glory Housein which the non-profit organization will provide apartments for participants of the Just Home project in its new apartment building under construction.

“We certainly want (the housing) to be safe – we want to be sure that it’s well maintained,” said Kari Benz, county social services director. “Some of the comments we heard on a fairly regular basis while working with people who were impacted (by justice) were simply, ‘I don’t want to live in a shit hole.'”

Who will this grant and partnership help?

A main objective of the grant is to specifically help people who have not only been impacted by the justice system, but also come from groups that are disproportionately represented in jails and prisons.

  • In our region, Native Americans are disproportionately incarcerated.

Through meetings with stakeholders, Benz and the Just Home team have identified two separate groups that need help.

  1. People who have had good supports in place, but are still struggling. For example, someone who has a criminal record and is now working in drug court, or someone who simply cannot find an affordable place.
  2. People who need more intense case management and holistic support. This is the group that the Glory House partnership really aims to serve.

“We really want people who have struggled with criminal activity in the past or mental health issues, addictions to have the opportunity to lead healthy and stable lives,” said Nicki Dvorak, president of the Glory House. .

In addition to the Glory House partnership, the grant is also help county secure 21 federal Section 8 housing vouchersthat help low-income people find housing.

Tell me more about the partnership

The original agreement is for the Glory House to have 15 units available to Just Home Project participants in its new facility.

  • There are no clear timetable yet, however, for when the new installation is complete and open. But that likely won’t be until late 2023, Benz said.

Also still in development is the specific programming the Glory House will offer Just Home tenants, though it’s likely to mirror existing programming, Dvorak said.

  • This means that there may be tenants who receive the services of Glory House or enter into cost-sharing agreements if they perform random drug tests.
  • There may also be tenants who already receive services from other places in town like Southeastern Behavioral or other nonprofits.

What happens next?

The department has until December 16 to submit any revisions to the Housing Investment Action Plan that it sends to the MacArthur Foundation.

  • Then it will be a matter of waiting to see if the $4 million funding is approved.

“I think we have a good shot,” Benz said. “I think we have a really solid plan, and hopefully if we get approved, our goal would be to start accessing those vouchers immediately.”

For the House of Glory, next steps are to continue to meet with stakeholders on the specific needs of Native Americans who have been impacted by the justice system.

  • As the conversations and programming develop, Dvorak hopes they can start filling vacancies in their existing apartment building with Just Home participants even before the new building was finished.
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CWU President Delivers State of the University Address | New https://happy-holi.com/cwu-president-delivers-state-of-the-university-address-new/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 00:00:00 +0000 https://happy-holi.com/cwu-president-delivers-state-of-the-university-address-new/ ELLENSBURG, Wash. – Central Washington University President Jim Wohlpart delivered his annual state of the university address Nov. 4, reviewing the CWU’s goals and strategies. The half-hour address was delivered in the ballroom of the Student Union and Recreation Center and highlighted the future of community relations at the university. Wohlpart said the school is […]]]>

ELLENSBURG, Wash. – Central Washington University President Jim Wohlpart delivered his annual state of the university address Nov. 4, reviewing the CWU’s goals and strategies. The half-hour address was delivered in the ballroom of the Student Union and Recreation Center and highlighted the future of community relations at the university.

Wohlpart said the school is committed to its vision of being a “model learning community of equity and belonging,” focusing on access and opportunity for students of all kinds. Additionally, the school will establish a viable budget and work with community members, local leaders, the state legislature and campus groups to create a sustainable future, according to the address.

“We need to make sure our work becomes relational and not transactional,” Wohlpart said. “That is to say, for any transformation of our university to happen, for us to lead and work in an equitable way that nurtures a culture of belonging, we must do so by building bridges and communities where everyone feels seen and heard.”

Wohlpart continued to mention reports of upcoming changes in student demographics; more importantly, the CWU has reason to expect a sharp increase in the number of students of color. He thinks it’s a chance for the school to reinvent itself as a more diverse and equity-based school.

“This work will challenge us to become a learning organization, to investigate our thought patterns that invisibly guide much of our day-to-day operations – systems and structures that benefit the few, people like me, while excluding, disadvantaging and even diminishing so many others,” said President Wohlpart.

The school has been working on a plan called Central Experience, which outlines the school’s priorities between 2023 and 2025. This includes expanding bilingual STEM access, increasing employee salaries, addressing the loss of learning due to the pandemic and improving students’ financial literacy.

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Buffalo Bills meets acquisition needs of RB Hines, S Marlowe National News https://happy-holi.com/buffalo-bills-meets-acquisition-needs-of-rb-hines-s-marlowe-national-news/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 00:05:40 +0000 https://happy-holi.com/buffalo-bills-meets-acquisition-needs-of-rb-hines-s-marlowe-national-news/ ORCHARD PARK, NY (AP) — The AFC-leading Bills refused to sit idly by Tuesday at the NFL’s trade deadline, with general manager Brandon Beane addressing key needs of Buffalo’s offensive backfield and high school exhausted by injuries. Beane began by adding an established pass-catching dimension by acquiring running back Nyheim Hines in a trade from […]]]>

ORCHARD PARK, NY (AP) — The AFC-leading Bills refused to sit idly by Tuesday at the NFL’s trade deadline, with general manager Brandon Beane addressing key needs of Buffalo’s offensive backfield and high school exhausted by injuries.

Beane began by adding an established pass-catching dimension by acquiring running back Nyheim Hines in a trade from the Indianapolis Colts. Buffalo traded third-string running back Zack Moss and a conditional sixth-round pick in next year’s draft to the Colts to land Hines, who provides the Josh Allen-led offense with an experienced double threat.

Beane then filled an important need for depth on defense by trading a seventh-round pick to acquire safety Dean Marlowe from Atlanta. Marlowe has seven seasons of NFL experience and is familiar with the Bills’ defensive pattern after a three-year stint at Buffalo from 2018-2020.

Despite having little room under the salary cap, the sixth-year general manager opted to augment a roster that gave Buffalo a 6-1 start, tying its best record in seven games since 1993.

Buffalo has won four straight after claiming a 27-17 victory over Green Bay on Sunday and is preparing to travel to face the New York Jets (5-3) this weekend.

Hines fills a role behind starter Devin Singletary that Beane has been eager to tackle since free agency in March, when JD McKissic reneged on a deal to sign with Buffalo returning to play for Washington.

In his fifth season in the NFL, Hines joins an offense that leads the league in yards gained, passing yards and ranks second in points scored. He is expected to take on the third role currently held by rookie James Cook, which has been used sparingly this season.

After scoring his first touchdown of the season on a 5-yard rush in a 17-16 loss to Washington last weekend, Hines has 18 carries for 36 yards and 25 catches for 188 yards in seven games. Overall, the 25-year-old has 1,205 rushing yards and 10 touchdowns, and 1,725 ​​receiving yards and seven touchdowns in 72 career games since being selected by the Colts in the fourth round of the 2018 draft.

He still has two seasons left on a three-year, $18.6 million contract extension he signed in September 2021.

Moss, a 2020 third-round pick, became the odd man in Buffalo after seeing his role start to dwindle last season. He’s been inactive in each of Buffalo’s last two games and has 17 carries for 91 yards, plus seven catches for 27 yards.

Moss scored four rushing touchdowns and a touchdown in each of his first two seasons at Buffalo.

Marlowe joins a thin Bills defense at safety. Starter Micah Hyde underwent season-ending neck surgery after being injured in Week 2, while fellow starter Jordan Poyer’s status is uncertain after suffering an elbow injury against Green Bay.

The Bills welcome back Tre’Davious White after activating the starting cornerback from the physically unable to play roster on Tuesday, although it’s too early to determine if he’ll play this weekend. White has been out since torn a ligament in his left knee in a 31-6 win over New Orleans 11 months ago.

The Bills freed up space on their roster by releasing defensive tackle Brandin Bryant and receiver Isaiah Hodgins.

Buffalo also revamped its practice roster, bringing in cornerback Xavier Rhodes and releasing cornerback Jordan Miller. Rhodes, 32, suffered a hamstring injury shortly after being signed by the Bills in late September.

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LeBron James says Elon Musk has to deal with ‘frightening AF’ surge in N-word use on Twitter https://happy-holi.com/lebron-james-says-elon-musk-has-to-deal-with-frightening-af-surge-in-n-word-use-on-twitter/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 12:03:22 +0000 https://happy-holi.com/lebron-james-says-elon-musk-has-to-deal-with-frightening-af-surge-in-n-word-use-on-twitter/ LeBron James, left, and Elon Musk, right, in a composite image.Getty Images The use of the N-word on Twitter jumped almost 500% after the acquisition of Elon Musk, according to the Washington Post. Responding to an Insider article, NBA star LeBron James said Musk needs to “take this very seriously.” In a tweet, James called […]]]>

LeBron James, left, and Elon Musk, right, in a composite image.Getty Images

  • The use of the N-word on Twitter jumped almost 500% after the acquisition of Elon Musk, according to the Washington Post.

  • Responding to an Insider article, NBA star LeBron James said Musk needs to “take this very seriously.”

  • In a tweet, James called the rise of N-Word usage “scary AF.”

NBA star LeBron James on Saturday urged new Twitter owner Elon Musk to address the “frightening AF” rise in the use of the N-Word on the social media platform .

Tweeter In response to an Insider article, which cited Washington Post reporting on the increased use of racial slurs immediately following Musk’s $44 billion acquisition, James urged Musk to “take this very seriously.”

James wrote: “I don’t know Elon Musk and, tbh, I don’t care who owns Twitter. But I will say if this is true I hope he and his people take this very seriously because it is scary AF.

“So many unfit people say hate speech is free speech.”

The insider report refers to the findings of the Network Contagion Research Institute (NCRI). This research group analyzes social media content to predict emerging threats, which said that use of the N-word on Twitter increased nearly 500% within 12 hours of Musk’s deal being finalized.

A follow-up report from Bloomberg found a 1,300% increase in slurs used on the social media platform after news broke that Musk had made the deal on Twitter. Bloomberg reported that at its peak, the N-word popped up on Twitter 170 times every five minutes.

The Washington Post report said anonymous accounts appeared to be trying to assess the limit of Twitter’s moderation policies after “free speech absolutist” Musk bought it. The newspaper noted that several online trolling accounts called out others for using racist language in the wake of the deal.

“Elon now controls Twitter. Free the racial slurs. K—S AND N—–S,” said an anonymous account, using slurs for Jews and black people, according to the outlet.

Twitter has also been inundated with misogynistic and anti-LGBTQ posts, according to the outlet, with online trolls apparently carrying out “tests” on Twitter’s moderation policies under new owner Musk.

Musk tweeted on Friday that Twitter would form a “content moderation board with widely diverse views.” The billionaire added that major decisions on moderation would not be made before the board meeting.

Musk said in a later tweet that “we have not yet made any changes to Twitter’s content moderation policies”.

Read the original article on Business Insider

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